Ruby Enumerables:

Enumerable

The Enumerable mixin provides collection classes with several traversal and searching methods, and with the ability to sort. The class must provide a method each, which yields successive members of the collection. IfEnumerable#max, #min, or #sort is used, the objects in the collection must also implement a meaningful <=> operator, as these methods rely on an ordering between members of the collection.

Public Instance Methods

all? [{ |obj| block } ] → true or false

Passes each element of the collection to the given block. The method returns true if the block never returns false or nil. If the block is not given, Ruby adds an implicit block of{ |obj| obj } which will cause all? to return true when none of the collection members are false or nil.

%w[ant bear cat].all? { |word| word.length >= 3 } #=> true
%w[ant bear cat].all? { |word| word.length >= 4 } #=> false
[nil, true, 99].all?                              #=> false

any? [{ |obj| block }] → true or false

Passes each element of the collection to the given block. The method returns true if the block ever returns a value other than false or nil. If the block is not given, Ruby adds an implicit block of { |obj| obj } that will cause any? to return true if at least one of the collection members is not false or nil.

%w[ant bear cat].any? { |word| word.length >= 3 } #=> true
%w[ant bear cat].any? { |word| word.length >= 4 } #=> true
[nil, true, 99].any?                              #=> true

chunk { |elt| … } → an_enumerator
chunk(initial_state) { |elt, state| … } → an_enumerator

Enumerates over the items, chunking them together based on the return value of the block.

Consecutive elements which return the same block value are chunked together.

For example, consecutive even numbers and odd numbers can be chunked as follows.

[3, 1, 4, 1, 5, 9, 2, 6, 5, 3, 5].chunk { |n|
  n.even?
}.each { |even, ary|
  p [even, ary]
}
#=> [false, [3, 1]]
#   [true, [4]]
#   [false, [1, 5, 9]]
#   [true, [2, 6]]
#   [false, [5, 3, 5]]

This method is especially useful for sorted series of elements. The following example counts words for each initial letter.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s